Spicy Honey Lime Shrimp

Do shrimp intimidate you? They used to intimidate me. I would only buy them cooked and pink, because the raw ones scared me a little. I eventually started cooking them on occasion to figure them out and discovered that they are one of the easiest and quick cooking protein sources to make. I mean, come on, they’re SHRIMP, even their name tells you how easy they are to conquer.

One thing about shrimp…the “vein”. Just so you know…that’s not a vein. It a digestive track. Yep. Think about it for a sec. Got it? Yessiree…That’s poop. No worries, though it’s contained in a little membrane and it comes out really easily. In fact, most raw shrimp that you buy is already deveined for you, and really, the poop is mostly dirt.

Shrimp are sold by the size. The number you see on the package tells you how many shrimp you would expect to see in a pound. Plus, they give each size a name. So, small shrimp have 51-60 shrimp per pound, and extra jumbo has 16-20 shrimp per pound. When you look at your shrimp to pick a size, remember that shrimp shrinks a bit when cooked. You have two choices when buying shrimp: cooked or uncooked. Cooked shrimp is pink. If you are selecting shrimp to cook and serve hot, I suggest you use raw. Shrimp cooks very fast, and gets rubbery quickly if cooked too long. Cooked shrimp is perfect if serving cold, in a salad or with cocktail sauce. Raw shrimp is typically just the tail, deveined and the shell is cut, then it’s frozen. To defrost it, leave it in your fridge overnight, or leave it under running COLD water for a while until it’s defrosted. Remember, it only takes a little heat to cook shrimp, so hot water will start to cook it, so will defrosting in a microwave. To remove the shell, hold it by the tail end and pinch it while you pull the meat out. Pinching the end should make the meat pop right out.

Now for the question: are shrimp REAL food. Well, of course. Right? Unfortunately, most shrimp you find in the store is coated with preservatives to keep it fresh, including sodium bisulfite, sodium tri-polyphosphate and sodium metabisulfite. You can read more about preservatives here. To find preservative-free shrimp, buy fresh (if you’re lucky enough to live on a coast) or buy from a natural foods market, like Whole Foods or Trader Joes. Be sure to read labels and ask questions.

Spicy Honey Lime Shrimp

2 lbs raw large, extra large or jumbo shrimp, rinsed, shelled and deveined
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 ” piece fresh ginger, grated (For info on grating ginger: check out this post)
1/2 cup raw honey
1/2 cup fresh squeezed lime juice
1 TBS chili garlic sauce (find in the asian section of your grocery store)
1/8 cup olive oil
2 TBS cold water
1 TBS cornstarch

Be sure your shrimp is defrosted, if you bought it frozen. Under cold running water, remove shells and devein them, if necessary.

In a large bowl, place garlic, grated ginger, honey, lime juice, chili garlic sauce and olive oil. Mix well. Add shrimp, cover and place in refrigerator to marinate for 1-2 hours. The lime juice will cook and toughen the shrimp if left too long.

In a pan over medium heat, place the shrimp and marinade. Cook until shrimp are pink and opaque, about 4-6 minutes. Remove the shrimp to a platter with a slotted spoon. In a small bowl, combine the water and cornstarch until cornstarch is dissolved. Bring the sauce in the pan to a boil and add the cornstarch, stirring continuously until thick. Pour over the shrimp and serve hot. Salt and pepper to taste, if desired.

REAL food alert: buy preservative-free shrimp. Check your chili garlic sauce for preservatives.
FREEZER alert: you can freeze this sauce and skip the marinating step, just cook shrimp and pour the reheated sauce over it.

Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps

There are a million recipes out there for chicken lettuce wraps. They all use the typical ingredients, some are peanutty, some are super spicey, some have minced mushrooms, some leave out the water chestnuts (which in my opinion are absolutely necessary), and most use ground meat (typically chicken, turkey or pork).

This is my favorite recipe for lettuce wraps, and there are certain things I like that I include, but may not matter to others. First, I don’t like the texture of ground chicken for my lettuce wraps. I like actual pieces of chicken, but ones that are chopped finely. To accomplish this, I use my food processor and chop the chicken, but don’t turn it into ground mush. If you don’t have a food processor, you can do it by hand, or use one of those food choppers. Yes, it’s time consuming. If you don’t mind the texture of ground meat, just use ground chicken, but the eating experience will be different. Second, water chestnuts. This is a texture thing as well. I think it’s important to have the hard crunch of water chestnuts to offset the soft chicken. Third, the sauce. I like a kick, but if it has too much of a kick, the kids won’t eat it. This recipe has the perfect mild kick for my family (the last time I made this my six year old ate FIVE lettuce wraps). If you like more of a kick, up the amount of chili sauce. I also enjoy the peanut butter base. You could use a different nut butter if you’re allergic to peanuts. I also leave out the soy sauce, as we have soy allergies in our house. Trust me, you won’t miss it in this recipe. If your family loves these, or you have a larger family, double it. You will thank me. This really only realistically serves four. Plus, the leftovers are awesome.

A few technical notes: fresh ginger will make all the difference in this recipe. To prepare it, I peel one side of the ginger, then use a box grater, using the one that looks like a shredding blade, but is smaller. (Does that make any sense?) Basically, my grater has a slicer side, a shredder side: the side you would use for cheese, then a side that is really small, like a zester side, and the 4th side looks to me like the shredder, but is smaller. I have seen this called the grater side (but I always think of cheese when I hear “grate” because we always got out the grater to “grate some cheese”, we never “shredded cheese”). That is the side I use. I grate the ginger, using the unpeeled side to protect my fingers. Then I scrape the inside of the grater to get all of the ginger and any juice. This takes some time, so I do it before cooking the chicken. The chicken cooks super fast. See the pictures if I have completely confused you.

ASIAN CHICKEN LETTUCE WRAPS

1 1/2 TBS natural peanut butter
1/2 TBS honey
2 TBS beef stock
1/2 TBS sesame oil
1 TBS balsamic vinegar
1 tsp chili garlic sauce
1 tsp salt
1 inch knob of fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic
4 oz water chestnuts
1/2 onion
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 TBS olive oil
Lettuce of your choice (we like iceberg or butter lettuce)

In a microwave-safe bowl, heat peanut butter and honey for a few seconds, just until warm. Add the beef stock, sesame oil, vinegar, chili garlic sauce and salt. Whisk together until well mixed. Set aside.

Prep your veggies: Grate your ginger (see notes above the recipe for helps if you’re not sure how to do this) and mince your garlic. Set aside. Finely chop your water chestnuts and set aside. Finely chop your onions and set aside.

Finely chop your chicken into small pieces, either by hand, using a food chopper, or using a food processor (use the ‘pulse’ button so you don’t completely pulverize it).

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion. Cook until onion starts to soften and add the garlic and ginger. Cook for one minute and add the chicken. Cook, stirring often until chicken is no longer pink (this happens very quickly). Add the water chestnuts and sauce. Stir continually and cook until everything is well mixed and sauce is hot.

Serve with lettuce leaves. To eat, place a few spoonfuls in the center of a lettuce leave and wrap. Leaves closer to the center of the head of lettuce are naturally cupped and easier to use.

ALLERGEN alert: To make this peanut-free, sub almond butter or hazelnut butter for the peanut butter. For gluten-free, make sure the beef stock, chili garlic sauce and vinegar are gluten-free.

REAL FOOD alert: it is difficult to find chili garlic sauce without preservatives. If you need to, you can add an additional clove of garlic and red pepper flakes instead of the chili garlic sauce. Check your beef stock for additives and msg.

Asian Orange Chicken

I’m not much of a fast-food type gal. But, every once in a while I’ll strategically plan my errands around lunchtime in the area of a local Panda Express. I justify that it’s healthier than a hamburger, but it’s probably not. At least I’m getting veggies, right?

I have one son who is allergic to soy, so I don’t make chinese-style food all that often at home, but the rest of us love it, especially this recipe I happened upon thanks to allrecipes. It is one of our favorites. I pull some of the chicken aside before toss it in the sauce for my non-soy kiddo. Another great thing about this recipe is that you can make the sauce ahead of time and freeze it. This tastes the best with fresh squeezed juice from real oranges and lemons (one orange and 2-3 lemons).

ASIAN ORANGE CHICKEN 

Sauce:
1 1/2 cups water
2 TBS fresh orange juice
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/3 cup rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar
2 TBS soy sauce
1 TBS grated orange zest
1 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 tsp fresh ginger root, minced
1/2 tsp minced garlic
2 TBS green onion, snipped
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
4 TBS cornstarch
2 TBS cold water

Chicken:
3-4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 TBS seasoned salt
2 eggs
oil for frying

Make sauce by combining everything except the cornstarch and 2 TBS water in a saucepan. Combine well and bring to a boil over medium heat. In a small bowl, combine the cornstarch and 2 TBS cold water well. Pour the cornstarch/water mixture into the saucepan. Stir until the sauce thickens. Remove from heat.

Prepare the chicken by placing two bowls side by side. Crack the eggs into one bowl and whisk well. In the second bowl, combine flour and seasoned salt. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a large pot to 350-375 degrees. I usually throw a little piece of chicken in to see if it immediately starts bubbling around the food, that’s how you know it’s ready. Oil at a correct temp leaves less oil on the food, so it’s fried, but not greasy. If you put your food in too early, it will soak up oil before getting fried, leading to greasy food and higher calories. When your oil is ready, dip chicken in the eggs, then coat in flour and place in the oil. Do not over crowd the pan. At this point, I typically turn my heat down to medium. Your heat will changed based on how much you put in the oil and your stove. Watch how quickly they are browning and change your heat level as needed. Brown on each side. Check the first couple you pull out to make sure they are cooked through. Remove them to paper towels until all the chicken is finished browning. Toss in the sauce and serve with rice.

REAL food alert: Check the ingredients of your seasoned salt for MSG. Look for soy sauce that lists “soybeans”, not “hydrolyzed soy protein“.
ALLERGEN alert: make this gluten-free by using gluten-free flour and gluten-free soy sauce.
HEALTH alert: make this healthier by oven cooking your chicken.

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