Technique Tuesday: Cutting a Mango

We love mangos. They can be a pain in the tush to eat, though. You can peel them and gnaw the flesh off the seed while juice drips down your chin and fibers get stuck in your teeth. You can peel them and then attempt to slice the flesh off while it slips out of your hands over and over again and soon your counter top is awash is sticky orange goodness. How in the world do you eat these things?

First, info on mangoes: with all produce, you know if it’s good by smelling it. That’s what you hear all of the time. The problem is, in our crazy society, they refrigerate produce in order to extend its life and ship it to places it doesn’t grow. When I go to my grocery store to buy mangoes, they almost always are fairly cold and you can’t smell any scent coming off of them. That makes it difficult to find which ones are ripe and which ones are just bruised. First: color is not always an indicator of ripeness. It can be mostly green on the outside and still ripe. There are also different varieties that are different colors, from green and red, to orange and yellow. You want to avoid mangoes with blemishes or dark spots. Gently press and feel if it’s soft, but not mushy. That indicates a ripe mango. Mango season is summer, so try to make your mango dishes then, when the mangoes are the freshest.

On to the cutting! The mango is oblong. A long skinny seed runs most of the length of the mango, and it’s about 1/3- 1/4 of the width. Start by setting your mango on end on a cutting board. Cut through the skin and as close to the seed as you can (without nicking the seed), slicing off one side.

I tend to cut concave, not straight, to get as much of the flesh as possible. Next, do the same for the other side.

Now, take each half-moon side and score the flesh to the desired size. I like big chunks, but you can cut small dice size if you need to.

From here, I push the skin up (see pic) then use my fingers (but you can use a spoon, if you’re so inclined. I’m lazy and don’t like washing extra dishes) to dislodge the pieces from the skin. The last step is optional, and depends on your mango. Sometimes it’s not worth the effort, but there is still flesh attached to the seed, mostly along the sides where there is still skin attached.

To get that yummy goodness, first, cut through the last piece of skin and peel it off (like above). Then, slice off any remaining flesh from the seed. I tend to do this at an angle, so you’re not cutting chunks of seed off.

Repeat until you’ve cut off all of the flesh you can. The closer to the seed, the more fibrous the flesh is, so you can totally skip this step if you want. I don’t like to get too close to the seed, personally. I’ve also had mangoes that don’t have much left over. This one was very ripe and had plenty.

I would say that you’re done, but then I’d skip my husband’s favorite part of cutting mangoes: gnawing what’s left off the seed. We never throw the seed away until hubby or a kiddo gets their paws on it and chews every last fibrous piece off the pit. (I spared you that picture). Did I mention we love mangoes in our house?

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5 thoughts on “Technique Tuesday: Cutting a Mango

  1. This is awesome. I am the epitome of the first example. I even eat them over my sink in the morning because I know how messy yet irresistible they are.

  2. i love to use this almost as a garnish, if you make smaller triangular cuts then flip the cut sides almost inside out, it is perfect up against a big scoop of vanilla ice cream.

  3. Pingback: Strawberry Mango Trifle | fromscratchtoplate

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